Sunday, October 27, 2013

MOROCCAN SPICED PUMPKIN SOUP WITH POACHED COD & ARGAN OIL

-->Ingredients:            serves 6

1kl pumpkin, peeled & diced
1 large potato, peeled & diced
1 medium onion, peeled & diced
800ml chicken stock
400ml milk
½ a stick of cinnamon 
juice of one lime
1tspn *ras el hanout
1tsp freshly grated ginger
1tbsp chopped coriander
 Seasoning

To Garnish:
3tbsp Argan Oil
Coriander leaves


Place the diced pumpkin, potato, ginger, onion and cinnamon in a large saucepan and cover with the chicken stock and milk. Bring to the boil and simmer for 15-20 minutes until the pumpkin is tender.

Saturday, October 12, 2013

EAT THE SEASONS WITH LLAMPUGA


This week at Simply Fosh we have a really delicious, simple dish of “Llampuga” on our 3-course lunch menu. Sometimes known as dolphin fish or golden mackerel although it is probably more well known by its American (Hawaiian) name of Mahi Mahi, "Llampuga" has a slightly oily texture that I would describe somewhere as a cross between sea bass and tuna. Be careful when cooking as it tends to dry out quickly when overcooked, and it is best served a little pink in the middle.


The Mallorcan name of “llampuga” comes from the verb ‘llampegar’ (to flash, as in lightning), and the fishing season for this species coincides with the appearance of a few strong storms in late summer and some amazing lightening displays. Some say that the word ‘llampuga’ comes from the Latin lampare, which means shine, referring to the shiny golden colour of the fish; actually, in Spanish the ‘llampuga’ is also sometimes known by the name of “dorado”, which means ‘golden’. The fish are captured en nets called ‘llampugueres’ and they are long swimming, fast growing, migratory fish that originate in the Atlantic and immigrate to the Mediterranean when the water temperature is over 16 degrees. It’s one of those great-tasting seasonal fish that unfortunately have a very short season that runs from late august to the end of October.

Saturday, October 5, 2013

AUTUMN FRUIT


Autumn brings with it the arrival of quince, fresh figs and pomegranates. Most people seem to ignore these fruits but for any serious cook they can be an endless source of inspiration and I always look forward to having them in season.


Steeped in history and romance and almost in a class by itself, the pomegranate is a symbol of fertility in many countries and a very popular fruit all over the mediterranean to the Middle East; the "Granada", as it is known in Spain, is a round fruit with a thick, leathery red skin.